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Callum Innes

10 August - 6 October 1996

Callum Innes

Callum Innes: installation view, "Callum Innes, 1990 - 1996", Inverleith House, 1996.  

This retrospective exhibition by Callum Innes at Inverleith House was his largest and most significant exhibition to date. It occupied two floors; the Ground Floor largely devoted to major works produced since 1990 loaned from private and museum collections, and the first floor mostly devoted to work from 1996, never before shown in public.

Callum Innes was born in Edinburgh, where he continues to live and work - drawing inspiration from the landscape and shifting quality of light on Scotland's East Coast. In his early career as a painter, Innes was a figurative artist, working with themes of personal mythology and elements of landscape; however, following a Scottish Arts Council residency in Amsterdam in 1988, his style changed radically to one of abstraction. Much of his painting employs the removal of freshly painted areas of colour using brush or rivulets of turpentine, and he is unusual amongst many Scottish painters today in his mature use of abstraction.In 1995 he became the only artist to be nominated for both The Turner Prize, and The Jerwood Painting Prize.

The exhibition was accompanied by a fully illustrated publication including a new essay by Mel Gooding, which not only describes Innne's working methods but examines the paintings in depth.

The exhibition is sponsored by the Edinburgh-based design and communications group Tayburn McIlroy Coates, and is sponsored by The Scottish Arts Council and The Binks Trust.

Callum Innes

Callum Innes: installation view, "Callum Innes, 1990 - 1996, Inverleith House, 1996.  

Callum Innes

Callum Innes: installation view, "Callum Innes, 1990 - 1996, Inverleith House, 1996.  

All works courtesy of the artist.

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